How to Reverse Tooth Decay: A Dentist Explains

Reversing tooth decay, particularly in its early stages, is possible through a combination of preventive measures and oral care practices such as:

That said, it's important to note that while remineralizing tooth decay is possible, once demineralization progresses to a cavity, it is no longer possible to heal it. At that point, you would need to see a dentist for professional treatment.

In this article, I'll explain everything you need to know about tooth decay and how to reverse it. 

What is tooth decay?

Toot decay

Tooth decay, a progressive stage of enamel demineralization, is a common dental condition characterized by the gradual degradation of the tooth structure.

The tooth decay process occurs when acids produced by the bad bacteria in our mouth, primarily Streptococcus mutans, interact with sugary foods from our diet. This interaction leads to the formation of acids that attack the tooth's hard outer layer, which we call enamel.

When the acid produced attacks our enamel, this initiates a process that we call demineralization. Over time, demineralization leads to the initial stage of cavity formation which can result in the development of small openings in our enamel. The openings get progressively larger and eventually penetrate deeper into the tooth, causing symptoms like sensitivity and discomfort.

Eventually, these untreated cavities can no longer be remineralized and must be treated by a dentist through treatments like dental fillings.

To reverse or prevent tooth decay, we use tools like nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste to stimulate a process called remineralization (aka the opposite of demineralization).

What causes tooth decay?

A woman holding coffee mug

Demineralization and tooth decay are primarily caused by the interaction of acids with tooth enamel. These can be dietary acids or simply acids produced by the bad bacteria in our mouth.

Let's walk through some of the main causes of demineralization:

Bad Bacteria & Plaque

Dental plaque is a thin, sticky film that naturally forms on our teeth. It consists of bacteria colonies that feed on sugars and carbohydrates from the foods we consume.

As they metabolize these sugars, they produce acids as byproducts. These acids can gradually erode the minerals, primarily calcium and phosphate, from our teeth which leads to demineralization.

Regular brushing and flossing help remove dental plaque, reducing the presence of acid-producing bacteria and their harmful effects on enamel.

Dietary Acids

Consuming acidic foods and beverages can directly introduce acids into our mouths, disrupting our oral pH.

For example, citrus fruits, carbonated sodas, and fruit juices are naturally acidic. When these acidic substances come into contact with tooth enamel, they can weaken the enamel's mineral structure, making it more susceptible to demineralization.

Limiting the intake of acidic foods and practicing good oral hygiene can help mitigate the impact of these dietary acids on teeth.

Poor Oral Hygiene

Inadequate oral hygiene practices, such as infrequent or insufficient brushing and flossing, can lead to dental plaque accumulating on tooth surfaces.

When plaque is not regularly removed, it provides a breeding ground for acid-producing bacteria. These bacteria thrive in the plaque and continuously generate acids as they metabolize sugars.

The prolonged exposure of teeth to these acids can result in demineralization, making regular and thorough oral care essential for preventing enamel damage.

Dry Mouth

Saliva is known for its ability to neutralize acids and support the remineralization of enamel. It's an essential component of your oral microbiome.

However, conditions that reduce salivary flow, such as certain medications, medical conditions, or dehydration, can leave the mouth dry. In a dry mouth environment, acids are not effectively neutralized, and the protective effects of saliva are compromised.

This can lead to an increased risk of enamel demineralization and tooth decay, making it essential for individuals with dry mouth to manage this condition effectively.

To combat dry mouth, certain toothpastes and chewing gums contain xylitol, a compound that has been proven to promote saliva production and normalize oral pH.

Acid Reflux

Conditions like acid reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD) or frequent vomiting expose teeth to stomach acids, which are highly acidic and corrosive.

When these strong acids come into contact with tooth enamel, they can rapidly erode the minerals from the enamel surface, leading to demineralization.

Individuals with these conditions are at an elevated risk of enamel damage, and managing acid reflux or vomiting episodes is crucial to protect dental health.

Tooth Decay vs. Cavities

Tooth Decay vs Tooth Cavities

Tooth decay and cavities are interconnected terms used to describe different aspects of the same condition.

First, tooth decay is the broader concept, representing the gradual process of damage to tooth enamel. This process occurs when acids produced by oral bacteria interact with sugars and fermentable carbohydrates in the diet.

As these acids attack the enamel, it undergoes demineralization and gradually loses its mineral content. Tooth decay is a continuous process that can progress over time if preventive measures are not taken.

Cavities, on the other hand, are the physical manifestations of advanced tooth decay. They are the actual holes or openings that form in the enamel when demineralization progresses unchecked.

Cavities are permanent structural defects in the tooth and require dental intervention to remove the damaged portion and restore the tooth's integrity.

In essence, tooth decay is the underlying process that leads to the development of cavities, and preventive measures aim to stop or reverse tooth decay in its early stages to prevent the formation of these cavities.

Tooth Decay Symptoms

A man having toothache

Tooth decay, also known as dental caries or cavities, manifests with various symptoms that can indicate its presence and progression.

For example, one of the initial signs of tooth decay is increased tooth sensitivity, where affected teeth become more responsive to temperature changes or sweet and acidic foods. As decay advances, you may experience persistent or intermittent toothaches, often characterized by discomfort or pain in the affected area.

Additionally, visible indicators of tooth decay include the presence of holes, pits, or dark spots on the tooth's surface, along with changes in tooth color, such as white, brown, or black spots. Perhaps worst of all, bad breath or an unpleasant taste in your mouth can result from bacterial activity within the cavity.

In more advanced stages, you may encounter pain while chewing, as well as swelling around the affected tooth or the presence of pus, indicating an infection. If you experience these symptoms, be sure to make an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible for professional treatment.

Preventing and Reversing Tooth Decay

a lady brushing her teeth

To prevent and reverse tooth day, we can take measures such as:

Specifically, brushing your teeth at least twice a day for two minutes each with nano hydroxyapatite and a soft-bristled toothbrush will help remove plaque and disrupt the growth of harmful bacteria.

In fact, nano hydroxyapatite is a biomimetic agent that mimics the natural composition of our permanent teeth and supports remineralization.

Basically, nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste deposits calcium and phosphate ions back into enamel which strengthens it and makes it more resistant to demineralization. 

In comparing hydroxyapatite vs fluoride, hydroxyapatite toothpaste is equally as effective at remineralization.

Of course, visiting the dentist regularly and limiting sugary and acidic foods are also essential steps to take to promote good oral health. Instead, consider adding natural probiotics to your diet such as fermented foods or calcium rich foods to support your overall health.

Can you reverse cavities?

A lady holding a tooth cavity model

No, you cannot reverse cavities. While tooth decay can be stopped or reversed through remineralization, deep cavities cannot be remineralized or reversed and must be treated by a professional through a procedure like a root canal.

While some individuals suggest that you can heal cavities naturally, the truth is that the "cavities" they are referring to are likely just initial stages of tooth decay and not true cavities. Ultimately, the decision to fix a cavity with a filling changes from dentist to dentist.

Even though you cannot remineralize cavities, there are steps you can take at home to remineralize tooth decay and prevent cavity formation, including:

Ultimately, while we cannot reverse cavities, we do have the ability to prevent new ones from forming and maintain good health through a proper oral care routine and lifestyle.

The Bottom Line: Reversing Tooth Decay

Reversing tooth decay, especially in its early stages, is possible through a process called remineralization.

Remineralization involves depositing essential minerals, primarily calcium and phosphate, back into the tooth enamel, making it stronger and more resistant to damage. We can support the natural remineralization process by brushing with nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste and flossing with expandable floss daily.

It's important to note that the effectiveness of remineralization depends on the extent of the decay and early intervention. In advanced stages, dental treatment like fillings may be necessary to address the damage.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is it possible to reverse tooth decay?

Yes, it is possible to reverse tooth decay, particularly in its early stages, through a process called remineralization. Remineralization involves depositing essential minerals like calcium and phosphate back into the tooth enamel, strengthening it and making it more resistant to damage. Nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste can support this process as it is made of the same material that your teeth and bones are. The said, the success of remineralization depends on the extent of decay and early intervention. Advanced decay and cavities require dental treatment to address the damage effectively.

Can tooth decay be saved?

Yes, tooth decay can be saved and treated, especially when detected in its early stages. The process involves several approaches, depending on the extent of the decay. In early stages, remineralization can occur by depositing essential minerals back into the enamel, making it more resistant to further damage. You can support remineralization at home by brushing daily with a nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste. Once a physical cavity has formed, dentists can remove the decayed portion and fill the cavity with materials like dental fillings or composite resins to restore the tooth's integrity. In more advanced cases, when decay has reached the inner pulp, a root canal may be necessary to remove infected or damaged tissue and save the tooth.

What neutralizes tooth decay?

To neutralize tooth decay, it's essential to focus on remineralization and prevent enamel demineralization. Remineralization involves depositing essential minerals like calcium and phosphate back into the tooth enamel, strengthening it and making it more resistant to damage. Nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste can support this process as it is made of the same material that your teeth and bones are. Additionally, maintaining a balanced diet rich in calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D provides the necessary nutrients for enamel health and neutralizes decay by supporting remineralization.

Can you bring back a rotten tooth?

A tooth that has severely decayed, often described as "rotten," cannot be restored to its original, healthy state. However, dental professionals can provide treatments to address the damage and preserve oral health. In the early stages of decay, remineralizing through nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste is possible. However, when decay reaches the inner pulp and causes infection or pain, a root canal treatment may be necessary to remove the infected tissue and seal the tooth. In more extensive cases, a crown or cap may be placed to protect and strengthen the tooth. In some situations, when the decay is too advanced or if the tooth poses a risk to overall oral health, extraction may be the only option.

How can I restore my decayed teeth naturally?

To restore your decayed teeth, it's essential to focus on remineralization and prevent enamel demineralization. Remineralization involves depositing essential minerals like calcium and phosphate back into the tooth enamel, strengthening it and making it more resistant to damage. Nano hydroxyapatite toothpaste can support this process as it is made of the same material that your teeth and bones are. The said, the success of remineralization depends on the extent of decay and early intervention. Advanced decay and cavities require dental treatment to address the damage effectively.


NOBS Toothpaste Tablets
NOBS Toothpaste Tablets
NOBS Toothpaste Tablets
NOBS Toothpaste Tablets
NOBS Toothpaste Tablets
NOBS Toothpaste Tablets

NOBS Toothpaste Tablets

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NOBS is everything toothpaste should be - all the good stuff, and none of the junk.

Fluoride Free
Never any fluoride, and no harsh abrasives.

We used the magical remineralizing power of nano-hydroxyapatite to protect your teeth long-term. It's the safest alternative to fluoride!

Unlike messy tube toothpaste, NOBS are easy to store and use anywhere.

Thanks to our unique blend of natural ingredients, NOBS will make your breath as fresh as you look. Instead of gross sweeteners that cover up a natural slightly bitter aftertaste, our organic mint will leave you so kissable. Trust us, your date will thank you.

Flex on TSA

NOBS toothpaste tablets don’t apply to the 3.4oz limit. Fly with confidence that you won’t be condemned to a dirty mouth while you travel.

No Mess

Never worry about your toothpaste tube exploding over your other toiletries. NOBS toothpaste tablets come in an air-tight glass jar, free of plastic and without the mess. Unscrew, chew, and renew your mouth.

No Plastic

We want you to disrupt your brushing routine, not your endocrine system. Unlike other brands, our product is free of all plastics and BPAs.

Perfect Size

NOBS toothpaste tablets are individual and perfectly dosed. No more squeezing, no more tube sliding against the edge of your sink and definitely no wasted toothpaste.

Safe for Children

Protecting little ones is our top priority. NOBS provides the safest oral care for pregnant women and their families. Just monitor and ensure that your child can chew and swallow safely before introducing them to NOBS.


This product is not suitable for pets. Humans only, please!

While xylitol is great for supporting the human oral microbiome, it can be toxic to pets. Please keep NOBS away from your furry friends, and contact your veterinarian immediately if consumed by your pet.

Fluoride Free Toothpaste Tablets

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